More writing, less digging

I need to cool my jets. Recent projects have been so interesting and consuming, that I haven’t taken the time to slow down and write them up.

Documents and photos are piling up. Some cursory analysis has been done, but just enough to catapult me into the next challenge. I think writing can wait, more discoveries! Discoveries to be made!

Might be time to slow down and embrace the famous admonition: It’s the journey not the destination. Who said that anyway? (focus, focus!)

I know there are drives for directed blogging prompts and some people really like them, but do I really need them? Don’t think so. I have enough material to last me several lifetimes.

So what have I been working on?

Facebook

In spring of this year, I felt a desire to communicate more with Seattle Genealogical Society members, but felt it hard to get down to the library. So, I have volunteered to moderate the SGS Networking Facebook Group. After a slow start, we now have about 20 members and growing everyday.

Rhodes

In November of 2014, my grandmother passed forward my second great grandmother’s genealogical notes. What a treasure! Therein, I discovered a 7-decade old brickwall that at least a dozen people have been working on. We wish to know the origins of the patriarch Alexander Rhodes (1790-1840) of the Rhodes in Illinois. So, I decided to aim my genetic genealogy skills at the problem, and now we have a thriving project well on its way to connect the Rhodes to the long suspected Rhodes and Standiford families of Anne Arundel, Maryland. Illinois Rhodes from Maryland.

Dodson

Along with that mystery came the knowledge that we also do not know much about the Dodson families of Fayette County, Illinois. It’s Anna Dodson’s search for her husband’s family patriarch (Alexander Rhodes) that brought to light that we also do not know who her father’s parents are. James Knox Polk Dodson (1850-1905), who were your parents? Speak up! I’m now in contact several Dodson families outside of Illinois that look promising. We’re comparing our chromosome segments looking for commonalities, and I hope to be able to close this cold case within a year.

Paternity

And finally, the holy grail. I discovered a year ago that I am the NPE (non paternity event) in my generation after a DNA test to contribute to a health study revealed some anomalous (but not entirely surprising) results. The journey to get to the heart of the how, why, when, where and who… intense, exhausting, at times troublesome. It’s been so challenging to get my head wrapped around, and such a sensitive issue, that I find it difficult to write about publicly. However, I still feel a desire to do so. My nature is to want to be both transparent, and yet kind and fair concerning the privacy and feelings of the living still connected with the issue. The decision to share about it always comes down to wrestling with some core issues of ethics… am I entitled? To discover, to talk, to question, to continue to seek? Whose feelings are more important… mine? Or the extended family who may feel some shame, discomforts, or insecurities about my drive to know the truth? And what about the others like me? The people I know who can benefit from what I’ve learned, how I’ve struggled, and what I’ve discovered about the nature of acknowledging that I do have a right to know the truth. They matter, they are deserving as well. I’ve learned that there are protected places that we can gather to have these conversations… so I have been taking my questions and contemplations there.

If you are a person considering trying to discover birth parents, or the nature of an NPE in your family tree, I highly recommend visiting DNA Adoption for how-to articles and support in your quest.

Great. This is a good start, and an opportunity to start fresh.